Unibet Togel Hongkong CEO, Peter Nylander released on a €200,000 bail

Togel Hongkong

 

 

Unibet’s CEO Petter Nylander was yesterday transferred from the Netherlands to the French legal authorities in Nanterre. The judge decided to release Petter Nylander under the condition of a bail of €200,000 and told that he is to be placed under investigation, which is one step short of being charged, but the case is not likely to lead to a trial.

 

Detained at Amsterdam’s Schipol Airport for violations against France’s 19th Century gambling monopoly laws, the case has come as an embarrassment to the nation’s Government as it seeks to iron out regulatory proposals on online gaming in-line with European Union law.

 

Upon leaving court in the western Paris suburb of Nanterre, the boss of the Malta-licensed firm stated that Unibet had always obeyed the law.

 

The European Union seems to agree as it has disputed the legality of French gambling laws that see lottery operator Francaise Des Jeux and horse racing betting group PMU protected by monopoly laws dating back to 1836 and 1891.

 

France issued the European arrest warrant for Nylander after he failed to respond to a court order in April but this caused controversy with two members of the European Parliament objecting to the use of a European warrant to detain the Swede. They stated that these warrants were designed to arrest people accused of violent crimes rather than those in business disputes.

 

Microsoft, Yahoo and Google paid $31.5 Million for advertising the “illegal” internet gambling

 

Microsoft, Yahoo and Google – the three largest Internet companies agreed on Wednesday to pay a combined $31.5 million to settle federal civil allegations that they had accepted ads for illegal internet gambling.

 

The Togel Hongkong companies said they stopped taking the ads years ago. The settlement was announced by Catherine L. Hanaway, the United States attorney for eastern Missouri, who said the investigation, conducted by her office, the Internal Revenue Service and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, dated to 2000. Negotiations have been going on for 12 to 18 months, she said.

 

Microsoft’s $21 million portion of the settlement includes a $4.5 million forfeiture, $7.5 million to be paid to the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children and $9 million in public service ads over a three-year period, starting next year.

 

The public service campaign will aim the message that online gambling is illegal at those of college age and younger.

 

“We’re hopeful that our educational campaign will stop young people from gambling before they start,” the company said. Yahoo’s $7.5 million share of the settlement includes a $3 million forfeiture and $4.5 million in public service ads over three years.

 

Google will pay $3 million. A spokesman, Jon Murchinson, said the ads were in sponsored links at Google.com and other Web sites that belong to its ad network. “While we did not admit any wrongdoing, the Department of Justice has advised that online gambling is illegal in the United States, and ads to promote it are improper,” he said.